Why Revisit the Early Modern Canon?

The thing about canons is that they seem sacred. Challenging them, even revisiting them, can seem heretical. Facing these facts is the first step in addressing the intransigence of the early modern philosophical canon. Step two involves noticing just how much the canon leaves out.


Cambridge University Press to publish Renaissance Quarterly for the Renaissance Society of America

Cambridge University Press is partnering with the Renaissance Society of America (RSA) to publish Renaissance Quarterly, the leading American journal of Renaissance Studies.…


Special Issue of the Cognitive Behaviour Therapist on Complexity within Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

When I first took over as Editor-in-Chief of the Cognitive Behaviour Therapist (tCBT), I was extremely excited to hear that there was already a planned (and almost completed) forthcoming Special Issue on Complexity in Cognitive Behaviour Therapist (CBT) being Guest Edited by Claire Lomax and Stephen Barton from Newcastle University, UK (Lomax & Barton, 2017).…


Genomics in heavy pigs unravels a dry-cured ham tale of quality and tradition

The animal article of the month for September is ‘Genome wide association studies for seven production traits highlight genomic regions useful to dissect dry-cured ham quality and production traits in Duroc heavy pigs‘ Heavy pig production chains are very important sources of niche pork products, particularly in several European countries with long traditions in processed products.…


A day in the life of a Library Sales Executive

Q & A with Louise Deane – Library Sales Executive   You are a Library Sales Executive – how long have you done this for and what regions do you cover in your role?


From the Fetus, the Child

Any parent with two or more children knows that babies are different at birth and often those differences persist as the baby develops.…


The Tudor banquet: digital text mining reveals new information

This blog accomapnies Louise Stewart’s Historical Journal article ‘Social Status and Classicism in the Visual and Material Culture of the Sweet Banquet in Early Modern England‘ Today, the term ‘banquet’ is commonly used to refer to any lavish feast.  However, in the Tudor and Stuart period the word had a different, and very specific meaning, referring to a separate meal which consisted solely of sweet foods.  In September 1591, for example, Queen Elizabeth I visited the Earl of Hertford at his estate at Elvetham.  The lavish entertainments provided for the queen during her four day stay included water pageants, fireworks, feasts and a glittering ‘banquet’.  A printed account of the entertainment makes it clear that this banquet was no ordinary meal.  It was served in the garden after supper, ‘all in glass and silver’ and accompanied by a spectacular fireworks display.  The queen was presented with a thousand sweet dishes including sculptural sugar work representing her arms, castles and forts, human figures and mythical and exotic animals as well as preserved fruits and other confections.  This elaborate spectacle was typical of the sweet banquet.…


The current state of parasite discovery and taxonomy

The latest Paper of the Month from Parasitology is ‘The geography of parasite discovery across space and over time’ by Robert Poulin and Fátima Jorge.…


The National Rise in Residential Segregation

People talk a lot about segregation.  Every week it seems that news reports or some new academic finding shows that segregation is related to some salient outcome.  The traditional story of how America became segregated is that blacks moved to Northern cities in the early twentieth century and whites, aided by government mortgage programs and the development of the interstate highway, fled to suburban areas, creating cities with black and poor urban cores and wealthier and whiter suburbs.  With the flight of wealthier white residents to the suburbs, the resources available to the urban core declined, leaving minorities fewer resources and effectively creating a poverty trap.…


Barriers to exclusive breast-feeding in Indonesian hospitals

The Nutrition Society Paper of the Month for July is from Public Health Nutrition and is entitled ‘Barriers to exclusive breast-feeding in Indonesian hospitals: a qualitative study of early infant feeding practices’ by Authors: Valerie J Flaherman, Shannon Chan, Riya Desai, Fransisca Handy Agung, Hendri Hartati and Fitra Yelda.


The latest KBART improvements

Cambridge Core was designed to allow for continual improvement based on feedback from our customers. Since launch, KBART lists have seen significant improvements, with the latest being the ability to select more granular options when setting variables for your list downloads.…


Porous Carbon and Carbonaceous Materials for Energy Conversion and Storage

Growing awareness of increasing global population and energy demand, diminishing supplies of fossil fuels, proliferating environmental pollution, and climate change has driven rapid developments in materials research in energy conversion and storage.