Cambridge University Press staff cycle for conservation

For the third year in succession, a team from Cambridge University Press, including a group of Cambridge Journals staff, took part in the London to Cambridge Cycle Ride, raising money for Fauna & Flora International (FFI) for whom we publish Oryx – the International Journal of Conservation.…


A New Approach to Open Access Mathematics Publishing

Cambridge University Press is delighted to be launching two new open access (OA) journals in Mathematics, Forum of Mathematics, Pi and Forum of Mathematics, Sigma.…


Nature vs nurture – a neurological insight

As the nature vs nurture battle continues to rage, a special issue of Twin Research and Human Genetics offers new insights to the debate, with a special issue dedicated to the Genetics of brain structure and function.


100 year old account of the ‘depraved’ sexual habits of the Adélie Penguin rediscovered.

Image: Dr George Murray Levick’s observations of Adélie penguins were recorded in his notebook. Photograph: R Kossow/Natural History Museum In 1910 Dr.…


Why we need a World Energy Health Organisation

The global energy outlook today easily matches the toughest challenges of the 1970’s oil crises. We face growing energy demands from developing nations, higher projected electricity use in developed countries, unprecedented pressure on global oil supplies, an uncomfortable dependence in Western Europe on Russian gas and an on-going debate about emissions and pollution caused by growing energy use.…


Increase in marine turtle predation by jaguars highlights potential conservation management dilemma

  Photograph: GVI Costa Rica Increase in marine turtle predation by jaguars highlights potential conservation management dilemma A recent paper in Oryx has highlighted an interesting conservation conundrum.…


Cambridge Journals staff volunteer at nature reserves

Some may say that those of us who work in academic publishing are impractical people unused to manual labour. They may also say that office workers are cosseted and unwilling to brave the elements.…


Meet the new Editor-in-Chief of The Canadian Entomologist

My name is Chris Buddle – I’m an Associate Professor at McGill University, in Quebec, Canada, and the new Editor-in-Chief for The Canadian Entomologist.…


New review, published in Bird Conservation International, reveals a worrying decline in the world’s seabirds

The status of the world’s seabirds has deteriorated rapidly over recent decades and several species and many populations are now perilously close to extinction.…


Call for Papers: Politics, science and policy of reference points for resource management

Environmental Conservation is one of the longest-standing, most highly-cited of the interdisciplinary environmental science journals. It includes research papers, reports, comments, subject reviews, and book reviews addressing environmental policy, practice, and natural and social science of environmental concern at the global level, informed by rigorous local level case studies.…


Asia-Pacific Signal and Information Processing Association and Cambridge University Press launch new Open Access journal

The Asia-Pacific Signal and Information Processing Association (APSIPA) and Cambridge University Press are pleased to announce the launch of the APSIPA Transactions on Signal and Information Processing – a groundbreaking new Open Access journal that will serve as an international forum for signal and information processing researchers across a broad spectrum of research, ranging from traditional modalities of signal processing to emerging areas where either (i) processing reaches higher semantic levels (e.g.…


The Canadian Entomologist journal joins Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press has announced that it will become the new home of The Canadian Entomologist from January 2012.  “One of the best publishers in the business will now be marketing, publishing and distributing one of the oldest and most respected Entomological journals in the world – it’s a match made in Entomological heaven.” said Dr Christopher Buddle, Editor-in-Chief The Canadian Entomologist.