Nutrition Society Paper of the Month: Socio-economic inequalities in diets in UK adults

Study written in the British Journal of Nutrition found that those higher up on the socio-economic ladder are generally healthier and are less likely to be obese, and what people eat varies across different social groups.


Calorie-focused thinking when it comes to obesity may mislead and harm public health

Perhaps not all calories are created equal. A new paper, co-authored by Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute cardiovascular research scientist James J.…


Cooking at home frequently may lead to healthier diet

Individuals who frequently cook at home tend to maintain a healthier diet than those who cook less frequently, according to new research released today at the American Public Health Association’s 142nd Annual Meeting in New Orleans.…


Sugar-sweetened beverages, not so sweet for your heart!

Sugar-sweetened beverages, not so sweet for your heart! says Amélie Keller from the Institute of Preventive Medicine, Frederiksberg Hospital, RegionH, Denmark.…


Vitamin D deficiency – the probable cause of many diseases?

“Gold standard” trials quoted by the Lancet rely on mistaken reasoning. The Lancet, the world’s best known medical journal, has published two articles which contain serious errors in scientific reasoning.…


Investigating the effect of gut microbiota on age-related health issues

The November Nutrition Society Paper of the Month is from Proceedings of the Nutrition Society  and is entitled Gut microbiota in older subjects: variation, health consequences and dietary intervention prospects”.…


Positive parenting practices: Encouraging vegetable consumption

The October Nutrition Society Paper of the Month is from Public Health Nutrition  and is entitled “Predicting use of ineffective vegetable parenting practices with the Model of Goal Directed Behaviour”.


Organically Grown Foods May Offer Greater Health and Safety than Foods Conventionally Grown

Scientists have long recognized the dangers of cadmium (Cd) exposure to the human body. Now, an invited commentary, place this finding in the context of the growing epidemiology linking Cd exposure to adverse health outcomes, and conclude that consistent consumption of organic foods over a lifetime could be expected to favorably influence health and mortality risk.