Find out the Guest Editors’ (Mary Cannon and John Lyne) response to questions about youth mental health following a recent special issue in Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine.

What is Youth Mental Health?

Youth Mental Health refers to mental health among adolescents and young adults. The time period covered by the term “youth mental health” typically ranges between 15-25 years of age though some would advocate that this should extend from 12-30 years. Youth mental health focuses on the well-being of young people, and aims to ensure that young people transition between childhood and adulthood with positive mental health. With this in mind a recently published issue of the Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine provided a focus on mental health during this youth phase of people’s lives.

Why highlight the Youth Mental Health agenda?

It is now recognised that many so-called “adult” mental health difficulties have their origins during adolescence and young adulthood. An illness prevention focus has been very effective in reducing the prevalence of some illnesses, such as heart attacks and cancers, however similar strategies have lagged behind in the field of mental health. Appropriate help for young people early in their lives has the potential to reduce later mental health morbidity. However, despite the high levels of mental health issues among young people, services for this age-group remain fragmented and difficult to access.  The delivery of tailored youth-friendly services could help address this need and is a particular focus of youth mental health advocates.

Why publish this special issue now?

This Special Issue follows on from the adoption of Youth Mental Health as the official annual theme by the College of Psychiatry of Ireland in 2013. Several annual Youth Mental Health Research conferences have been held in Ireland since 2011, establishing Ireland as one of the leading international countries in the field of youth mental health. This special issue aims to harness the large amount of research activity in this area in Ireland and internationally.

What does the issue include?

Scientific papers were contributed by several high profile national and international researchers. New data papers are included which report the prevalence of mental disorders among young Irish adults. Risk and protective factors for mental illness in young people and the importance of early intervention in psychosis and bipolar disorder are also addressed.  Editorials and perspective pieces by experts in the field address the challenges in providing seamless care during transition from childhood to adulthood, and give examples of youth services developed in United Kingdom, Canada and Ireland. Overall this special issue brings together high quality research which highlights that youth mental health should be prioritised on health policy agendas.

 

Read the full contents of the special issue free of charge here for a limited time period

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