Progress in Echinoderm Paleobiology: A New Special Issue of the Journal of Paleontology

A new special issue of the Journal of Paleontology, published on 12th June 2017, brings together a collection of 17 papers focused on different aspects of echinoderm paleobiology.


World’s biggest shark goes to school, thanks to 3D printing

University of Florida researchers are taking down the Plexiglas walls between museum collections and K-12 classrooms with an educational program that uses 3-D printed fossils and hands-on lessons to spark young learners’ interest in science, technology, engineering and math. The researchers published an assessment of their pilot lesson plan in “Paleontological Society Special Publications” The study '3-D Fossils for K-12 Education: A Case Example Using the Giant Extinct Sharkcarcharocles Megalodon'


Introducing Peter Clift, the new Editor-in-Chief of Geological Magazine

Geological Magazine is pleased to announce the appointment of Professor Peter Clift as the new Editor-in-Chief. Find out more about Peter and his plans for the journal in this introductory interview.


Solving the mystery of Antarctica’s ‘Blood Falls’

A study published in the Journal of Glaciology has solved a 100 year-old mystery involving a waterfall in Antarctica known as Blood Falls. New evidence links Blood Falls, a red waterfall in Antarctica, to a large source of salty water that may have been trapped underneath Taylor Glacier for more than a million years.


Climate change and risks to fossil fuel industry: sustainability train has left the station

Two seminal articles by energy experts in the latest issue of MRS Energy and Sustainability (MRS E&S) examine the climate-related risks facing the fossil fuel industry and conclude that the sustainability train has already well and truly left the station – and is not coming back.


Male or female? Challenging evidence of sex differences amongst dinosaurs

A paleontologist at the Canadian Museum of Nature is countering decades of studies that assert that some dinosaurs can be identified as male or female based on the shapes and sizes of their bones.


Kids’ Wildlife Preferences Differ from Island to Mainland

Growing up on an island or mainland location can shape the way children think about wildlife, including which species they prefer, according to North Carolina State University research, published in Environmental Conservation. Comparison surveys of children living in the Bahamas and in North Carolina reveal significant differences and potential challenges for wildlife-conservation efforts on islands.


Introducing Quaternary Research – an interdisciplinary journal

Quaternary Research has a nearly 50-year, distinguished history of publishing articles of interdisciplinary interest on the evidence for Quaternary climatic and environmental change, as well as its effects on landscapes, ecosystems, and human populations, and many significant articles have been published in the journal over the years.