Using third-party endorsements to build a brand’s reputation: The case of British chocolate

This blog post is based on the author’s paper Building Reputation through Third-Party Endorsement: Fair Trade in British Chocolate, published in Business History Review.…


Forgotten Lives and Universal Lessons

My book, Tax Law and Social Norms in Mandatory Palestine and Israel, emerged out of an interest I had, as a tax law teacher, in the history of tax avoidance doctrines.…


Q&A with Barbara Keys: Meet the Editorial Board for Modern American History

For the latest entry of our blog series introducing the board members of the new Cambridge University Press journal, Modern American History, Barbara Keys shares her thoughts on the field and on teaching American history in Australia.…


Examining the Role of the Reader: A Necessary Task for Catholic Biblical Interpretation

In this article, I enter the discussion over what constitutes Catholic biblical interpretation to argue that in order for biblical interpretation to be “Catholic,” it must integrate hermeneutical approaches that foreground real readers within the context of lived realities.…


Discovering a ‘new’ Tudor ballad by John Heywood

Read Jane Flynn’s full article published in the journal British Catholic History. A few years ago, I did an internet search involving the name ‘John Heywood’, the Tudor court entertainer, poet, and musician.  One of the hits was from the catalogue of manuscripts of the Durham Cathedral Library, in a description of a book of accounts dating from 1561–75.  It mentioned that the account book contains a 38-stanza poem that ‘begins “When all that is to was ys brought / As all that hath byn is” and ends “Maye rest in rest aye restyngly / Amen quoth John Heywood” [John Heywood ?1497-?1580]’, with the name ‘Thomas Good at the end’.  I was intrigued: was the poem by Good or Heywood?…


My Top 5 Journal of Hellenic Studies Articles – Part I

When I was asked to name my top five Journal of Hellenic Studies articles, it seemed to me that the only way to get any kind of handle on the huge treasury of classic scholarship that the JHS archives contain would be to take a personal view.…


The ‘Roman’ Modernism of Innocenzo Sabbatini’s Public Housing

Aristotle Kallis, Professor of Modern History at Keele University and one of the editors of PBSR, discusses his forthcoming article, ‘Rome’s singular path to modernism: Innocenzo Sabbatini and the “rooted” architecture of the Istituto Case Popolari (ICP), 1925-1930’, in Papers of the British School at Rome (2017), which will shortly be published via FirstView on the journal’s Cambridge Core web-page.…


Do we ‘read’ or ‘speak’ music? And what does the answer mean for transmitting knowledge in general?

In the July 2017 issue of the British Journal of Music Education (BJME), co-editor Martin Fautley’s editorial focuses on musical notation: when, why, and how it should be taught.…