From snowball Earth to the Cambrian explosion: Evidence from China

Geological Magazine Guest Editor, Xian-Hua Li answers questions on the thematic issue “From Snowball Earth to the Cambrian Explosion: Evidence from China”.…


Beehive fences protect farms from foraging elephants in Tanzania

Southern Tanzania is home to over half of East Africa’s elephants making it a globally important region for their conservation. Unfortunately, abrupt boundaries between protected areas and farmland mean elephants easily wander into village farms and eat or trample human food crops or both.…


How shifting continents influence global CO2 and climate

Continental configurations have come and gone over Earth’s history. From the steady cycling through supercontinental arrangements to the distributed scattering of numerous continents separated by oceans today, the geography of our world is constantly changing.…


Timber concessions may provide valuable additional conservation land for elephants

Forest elephants are found to occupy timber concession forests in Cameroon within areas currently deemed ‘unlikely’ by IUCN, according to a scientific study published in Oryx —The International Journal of Conservation.…


Testing the fossil record: how simulations help us understand the relative roles of diversification and preservation underlying diversity gradients in deep time

Biodiversity hotspots and gradients are a striking feature across the globe today. While the Latitudinal Diversity Gradient is the best known of these biodiversity patterns, strong gradients in species richness also exist in relation to topography and habitat heterogeneity.…


Au Revoir Atlantic, Hello Aurica

The study “The future of Earth’s oceans: consequences of subduction initiation in the Atlantic and implications for supercontinent formation” by João Duarte et al., recently published in Geological Magazine, presents their dramatic prediction for how the Earth may look in 250 million years from now as Supercontinent Aurica.…


The Anthropocene

This is an English translation of the Editorial to Annales. Histoire, Sciences Sociales Volume 72 – Issue 2. This issue of the Annales contains a thematic dossier dedicated to the Anthropocene, a concept currently enjoying undeniable scientific and public success.…


New study on the snow leopard in Mongolia reveals potential threats from increasing livestock

The study published in Oryx–The International Journal of Conservation indicates that increasing livestock numbers to supply the global market of cashmere have a negative impact on snow leopard’s wild prey, the Siberian ibex, and could undermine the long-term viability of the snow leopard itself.…


New MRS Award in renewable energy technology

MRS Nelson Buck Robinson Science and Technology Award for Renewable Energy - for early-career researchers announced


Unearthing the lineage of living fossils: the oldest mawsoniid coelacanth in Europe

The study “A mawsoniid coelacanth (Sarcopterygii: Actinistia) from the Rhaetian (Upper Triassic) of the Peygros quarry, Le Thoronet (Var, southeastern France)” by Uthumporn Deesri et al., recently published in Geological Magazine, presents and describes for the first time fossil evidence for a mawsoniid coelacanth recently unearthed from a quarry in southeastern France.…


We think we’re the first advanced earthlings—but how do we really know?

Imagine if, many millions of years ago, dinosaurs drove cars through cities of mile-high buildings. A preposterous idea, right? Over the course of tens of millions of years, however, all of the direct evidence of a civilization—its artifacts and remains—gets ground to dust. How do we really know, then, that there weren’t previous industrial civilizations on Earth that rose and fell long before human beings appeared? It’s a compelling thought experiment, and one that Adam Frank, a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Rochester, and Gavin Schmidt, the director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, take up in a paper published in the International Journal of Astrobiology.


Vedanta: A New Landmark in Litigating Extraterritorial Torts

The July 2017 issue (6:2) of Transnational Environmental Law (TEL) includes a contribution by Elena Merino Blanco and Ben Pontin examining jurisdictional grounds for hearing foreign tort claims, with reference to recent and ongoing oil pollution nuisance litigation involving Royal Dutch Shell Plc and its Nigerian subsidiary operating in the Niger Delta.…