Soviet famines roundtable published in Contemporary European History

The editors of Contemporary European History are delighted to present this roundtable on the Soviet famines of the 1930s, which brings into conversation leading scholars from around the world working in the field of Soviet history.


Cambridge University Press to publish Renaissance Quarterly for the Renaissance Society of America

Cambridge University Press is partnering with the Renaissance Society of America (RSA) to publish Renaissance Quarterly, the leading American journal of Renaissance Studies.…


Why Revisit the Early Modern Canon?

The thing about canons is that they seem sacred. Challenging them, even revisiting them, can seem heretical. Facing these facts is the first step in addressing the intransigence of the early modern philosophical canon. Step two involves noticing just how much the canon leaves out.


How do actors influence each other in regulatory decision-making?

Since the rise of regulation as a tool used by governments to intervene in different policy sectors in the late 1980s and early 1990s, countries around the word have established sector regulatory agencies to perform that task.…


The dynamics of policy change in authoritarian countries

In democratic countries, actors inside and outside the state have various channels for expressing their concerns and influencing policy agendas. In contrast, in authoritarian countries, less inclusive institutions lead to different dynamics of policy change.…


Picture-Book Professors: Academia and Children’s Literature

How is academia represented in children’s literature? This was a question that became important to me in the spring of 2012, whilst reading reams of picture-books with my three young boys, and wondering what they were understanding of their mother’s chosen profession from the media they were being exposed to.…


Threats to academic freedom in US history

In my piece, I emphasized the external pressures placed on individuals and institutions—what the American Association of University Professors termed “the tyranny of public opinion” in its landmark 1915 Declaration of Principles—because the connections were so clear and the challenges seemingly eternal.


Public Statement on Plan S

Cambridge University Press exists to advance knowledge, learning and research. As part of our purpose, we disseminate high-quality research and drive its impact and reach, working with the academic communities we support.…


Why do fewer women than men apply for grants after their PhD?

The Paper of the Month from the Society of American Archaeology is “WHY DO FEWER WOMEN THAN MEN APPLY FOR GRANTS AFTER THEIR PHDS” from the journal American Antiquity and is free to access until the end of October 2018 Why conduct a study about gender disparities in archaeological grant submissions?  Various studies have documented an increase in the proportion of women in academic archaeology among early and mid-career academics.…


Investing in the future at a 484-year-old press

At Cambridge University Press, we recognize that the central promise of the Open movement—that an open scholarly ecosystem will accelerate the ability of research to solve problems—is of the highest importance to our communities.


What does it mean to do good archaeological interpretation?

If you’re new to the field of archaeology, still learning the basics of the discipline, the chances are that your experiences of archaeological interpretation are relatively limited.…


STEM frenzy: teaching science to children and young people, 1830 – 1991

We live in interesting times for those seeking to inspire children and youth to take up science, technology engineering, and mathematics (STEM).…