Mutual Tolerance, Vivid Intellectual Intercourse, and Accountable Decision Making: The Mission of the Central European University

Part 3 from the introduction to the virtual special issue from Contemporary European History. We are accustomed to viewing 1989 as the end of state socialism.…


Common Beginnings with a Common Purpose: Contemporary European History and the Central European University

Part 2 from the introduction to the virtual special issue from Contemporary European History. In 1989 it seemed clear that glasnost in the Soviet Union had set in train unknown but certainly far-reaching changes in the Soviet Union and East Central Europe.…


Call For Africa Bibliography Introductory Papers

Articles of 5,000-8,000 words on topics relating to research, libraries, archives and publishing in and on Africa, and in African studies, are invited.…


Central European history and the opening up of Europe

Introducing a new virtual special issue from Contemporary European History. Since its creation in 1992 the journal Contemporary European History has actively sought to bridge Cold War divides and to bring the histories of Eastern, Western, Northern and Southern Europe into the same frame of analysis.…


Central European History at Fifty (1968–2018): Special Commemorative Issue

This blog post is taken from the ‘Letter from the Editor’ to the special edition of Central European History published to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Journal.    This special issue celebrating CEH’s fiftieth anniversary is divided into three parts that, together, offer wide-ranging reflections on the past, present, and future of both the journal and the historiography of German-speaking Central Europe as a whole.…


Shaping, not Describing: Assessing Charles Taylor’s Philosophy of Language

In his recent monograph, the renowned philosopher Charles Taylor targets genuinely big issues: What is the nature of language? What makes us human?…


Spotlight on the current issue (Volume 18-1) of the Journal of East Asian Studies

Imagine a Japan that was not allied with the United States in the postwar period. Would it have grown as fast as it did?…


Testing the fossil record: how simulations help us understand the relative roles of diversification and preservation underlying diversity gradients in deep time

Biodiversity hotspots and gradients are a striking feature across the globe today. While the Latitudinal Diversity Gradient is the best known of these biodiversity patterns, strong gradients in species richness also exist in relation to topography and habitat heterogeneity.…


We think we’re the first advanced earthlings—but how do we really know?

Imagine if, many millions of years ago, dinosaurs drove cars through cities of mile-high buildings. A preposterous idea, right? Over the course of tens of millions of years, however, all of the direct evidence of a civilization—its artifacts and remains—gets ground to dust. How do we really know, then, that there weren’t previous industrial civilizations on Earth that rose and fell long before human beings appeared? It’s a compelling thought experiment, and one that Adam Frank, a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Rochester, and Gavin Schmidt, the director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, take up in a paper published in the International Journal of Astrobiology.


New Research Points to the Origins of Agricultural Strategies in South America

The Society for American Archaeology’s paper of the month for April comes from Latin American Antiquity and is entitled: ‘Estrategias Humanas, Estabilidad Y Cambio en la Frontera Agricola Sur Americana’.…


Understanding the Complicated History of Shaft-and-Chamber Tomb Use in NW Jalisco, Mexico

The Society for American Archaeology’s paper of the month for April comes from Latin American Antiquity and is entitled: ‘Es Complicado: 1.260 Años de Tumbas de Tiro y Cámara en el Noroeste de Jalisco, México’.…


Olando and women’s suffrage – Part 3

Orlando: Women’s Writing in the British Isles from the Beginnings to the Present is a digital text, available on the web at orlando.cambridge.org.…