Criminal Justice: The DNA Revolution and the Evolution of Innocence

For centuries, scholars, judges and lawyers speculated about the error rate in the criminal justice system, many of them searching for absolute proof of the innocent person wrongfully convicted and imprisoned.  These efforts often proved futile, absent irrefutable evidence like in a nineteenth century case from Vermont in the United States.  In that case, two brothers were convicted of killing their brother-in-law after he went missing in 1812.  They spent seven years awaiting execution before their brother-in-law walked back into town very much alive.…


Q&A with Kevin M. Kruse: Meet the Editorial Board for Modern American History

For the latest entry of our blog series introducing the board members of the new Cambridge University Press journal, Modern American History, Kevin M.…


The ancient history and heritage of the Mosul region: an A–Z, Part I

Eleanor Robson, Editor of Iraq Over the past few months, the Iraqi armed forces and their allies have freed substantial areas of northern Iraq from ISIS/Da’esh, liberating many hundreds of thousands of people from the terrorists’ control.…


National Poetry Month: What is Poetry?

This April, it’s National Poetry Month; the largest literary celebration in the world, marking poetry’s continuing important place in our lives. To celebrate, we have asked acclaimed author and Professor of Literary Linguistics at University of Strathclyde, Nigel Fabb, to explain ‘What is Poetry?’.…


Brexit and Our World Wars

No one knows what Brexit means, but it’s now happening. Theresa May has pulled the trigger and the Great Escape is on.…


Historicizing Citizenship

Historicizing Citizenship in Post-War Britain was published in The Historical Journal This article has its roots in a very simple question: what was citizenship?…


Rethinking the English Revolution of 1649

Rethinking the English Revolution of 1649 by Jonathan Fitzgibbons was published in The Historical Journal When the axe fell on 30 January 1649, cutting short the troubled life of King Charles I, one eyewitness claims that there followed ‘such a groan’ from the crowds of spectators ‘as I never heard before and desire I may never hear again’.…


Meet the Editorial Board for Modern American History: Q&A with Brian Balogh

  For the latest entry of our blog series introducing the board members of the new Cambridge University Press journal, Modern American History, Brian Balogh shares this thoughts on the big issues that affect how we understand modern American history.…