Mobile armed mobs in deadly riots

Experts on ethnic riots agree that the ethnic composition of localities affects their susceptibility to violence. They are however divided on which are more prone to turmoil between ethnically segregated and diverse settings.…


One British Thing: A Bottle of Welfare Orange Juice

What does an empty bottle of concentrated orange juice have to do with colonialism? Some of you may remember the Welfare Orange Juice that the British government provided to pregnant women and young children from the middle of the Second World War until 1971.…


Why (not) Feathers? Period Hands and Material Encounters in Colonial Peru

My article on feather-work in colonial Peru shows, above all, that we should no longer differentiate between non-literate (material) Native Americans with feathers on their heads and literate Europeans with feathers in their hands. Far more important should be the historian’s distinction between non-literacy and knot literacy as this separates or connects cultures in the stories that we tell about the past.


Central European History Discussion Forum: The Vanishing Nineteenth Century in European History?

The nineteenth century just isn’t what it used to be. Any number of indicators – from academic job postings and doctoral dissertations to journal articles and conference panels –suggest that interest in the nineteenth century among historians of Europe has been declining over the past three decades.…


Reassessing the Hu–Wen Era: A Golden Era or a Lost Decade for Social Policy?

Journalists, China-watchers and academics have fiercely debated the legacy of China’s leaders, Hu Jintao and Wen Jiabao. Some see the Hu–Wen period (2002–2012) as a “golden era” of rapid growth, while others portray it as a “lost decade” for economic and political reform.…


‘Operation elections’: voting, nationhood and citizenship in late-colonial Africa

This blog accompanies the Historical Journal article Voting, Nationhood, and Citizenship in Late-Colonial Africa by Justin Willis, Gabrielle Lynch and Nic Cheeseman.…


Convict labour and penal transportations in the history of 19th and 20th centuries empires

In public memory, the history of convict labour, penal transportations and colonization is mostly associated with a number of historical stereotypes: The origins of modern Australia as a convict colony, or the notorious history of the Soviet Gulags; the forced labour camps in Nazi Germany, and the harsh, but also somewhat romanticized image of French penal colonies as pictured in the novel and film Papillon.…


Forgotten Geographies in Asian Studies

UC Irvine history professor Jeffrey Wasserstrom recently concluded his ten-year tenure as editor of the Journal of Asian Studies. One of the new practices that Wasserstrom introduced as editor was a “JAS-at-AAS” panel at the annual conference.


Special Forum: In Memory of the “Two Helmuts”: The Lives, Legacies, and Historical Impact of Helmut Schmidt and Helmut Kohl

This blog post is taken from the ‘Introduction by Andrew I. Port’ on a special forum that looks at the lives and legacies of Helmut Schmidt and Helmut Kohl.


Profile: Professor Margot Finn, President of the Royal Historical Society

Professor Margot Finn is an historian of Britain since 1750 and the current President of the Royal Historical Society. Her work has ranged from the history of Victorian popular politics to the gendered legal, social and cultural histories of debt and credit in England.  She is currently working on a monograph entitled Imperial Family Formations: Domestic Strategies and Colonial Power in British India, c.1757-1857.…


How do actors influence each other in regulatory decision-making?

Since the rise of regulation as a tool used by governments to intervene in different policy sectors in the late 1980s and early 1990s, countries around the word have established sector regulatory agencies to perform that task.…


The dynamics of policy change in authoritarian countries

In democratic countries, actors inside and outside the state have various channels for expressing their concerns and influencing policy agendas. In contrast, in authoritarian countries, less inclusive institutions lead to different dynamics of policy change.…