A Special Online Issue on Politics from Slavic Review

The news media can provide up to the minute information. The special August 2017 online issue of Slavic Review does something else.…


Q&A with Bruce J. Schulman: Meet the Editorial Board for Modern American History

For the latest entry of our blog series introducing the board members of the new Cambridge University Press journal, Modern American History, Bruce J.…


Using third-party endorsements to build a brand’s reputation: The case of British chocolate

This blog post is based on the author’s paper Building Reputation through Third-Party Endorsement: Fair Trade in British Chocolate, published in Business History Review.…


Forgotten Lives and Universal Lessons

My book, Tax Law and Social Norms in Mandatory Palestine and Israel, emerged out of an interest I had, as a tax law teacher, in the history of tax avoidance doctrines.…


Q&A with Barbara Keys: Meet the Editorial Board for Modern American History

For the latest entry of our blog series introducing the board members of the new Cambridge University Press journal, Modern American History, Barbara Keys shares her thoughts on the field and on teaching American history in Australia.…


Discovering a ‘new’ Tudor ballad by John Heywood

Read Jane Flynn’s full article published in the journal British Catholic History. A few years ago, I did an internet search involving the name ‘John Heywood’, the Tudor court entertainer, poet, and musician.  One of the hits was from the catalogue of manuscripts of the Durham Cathedral Library, in a description of a book of accounts dating from 1561–75.  It mentioned that the account book contains a 38-stanza poem that ‘begins “When all that is to was ys brought / As all that hath byn is” and ends “Maye rest in rest aye restyngly / Amen quoth John Heywood” [John Heywood ?1497-?1580]’, with the name ‘Thomas Good at the end’.  I was intrigued: was the poem by Good or Heywood?…


Q&A with Tomiko Brown-Nagin: Meet the Editorial Board for Modern American History

For the latest entry of our blog series introducing the board members of the new Cambridge University Press journal, Modern American History, Tomiko Brown-Nagin shares how she came to study modern American history and where she sees the field heading.…


New Review Essay on The Cambridge History of Capitalism

This is the abstract for a new Review Essay published in Business History Review by Angus Burgin entitled ‘Larry Neal and Jeffrey G.…


Adding Ireland to the Analysis – Ireland’s impact on the ‘Decade of Reform’

Read Jay Roszman’s recent article, ‘Ireland as a Weapon of Warfare’: Whigs, Tories, and the problem of Irish outrages, 1835 to 1839‘ in The Historical Journal.…


Q&A with Kevin M. Kruse: Meet the Editorial Board for Modern American History

For the latest entry of our blog series introducing the board members of the new Cambridge University Press journal, Modern American History, Kevin M.…


The ‘Roman’ Modernism of Innocenzo Sabbatini’s Public Housing

Aristotle Kallis, Professor of Modern History at Keele University and one of the editors of PBSR, discusses his forthcoming article, ‘Rome’s singular path to modernism: Innocenzo Sabbatini and the “rooted” architecture of the Istituto Case Popolari (ICP), 1925-1930’, in Papers of the British School at Rome (2017), which will shortly be published via FirstView on the journal’s Cambridge Core web-page.…


Revolution and Revolutionary Movements in Latin America: A Special Teaching and Research Collection of The Americas

The latest issue of The Americas is a specially curated collection that explores revolution and revolutionary movements in Latin American history from the colonial period to the present.…