One British Thing: A Bottle of Welfare Orange Juice

What does an empty bottle of concentrated orange juice have to do with colonialism? Some of you may remember the Welfare Orange Juice that the British government provided to pregnant women and young children from the middle of the Second World War until 1971.…


Ghost Stories in Early Modern England: The Social, Personal, and Spiritual Dynamics

In early modern England, spectral figures like Madam Savage were regular visitors to the world of the living and a vibrant variety of beliefs and expectations clustered around these questionable shapes.


Reassessing the Hu–Wen Era: A Golden Era or a Lost Decade for Social Policy?

Journalists, China-watchers and academics have fiercely debated the legacy of China’s leaders, Hu Jintao and Wen Jiabao. Some see the Hu–Wen period (2002–2012) as a “golden era” of rapid growth, while others portray it as a “lost decade” for economic and political reform.…


Cambridge University Press to publish Renaissance Quarterly for the Renaissance Society of America

Cambridge University Press is partnering with the Renaissance Society of America (RSA) to publish Renaissance Quarterly, the leading American journal of Renaissance Studies.…


Celebrating Peter Holland’s 19 years as Editor of Shakespeare Survey

To mark his 19 years as Editor of Shakespeare Survey before stepping down this autumn, Peter Holland has looked back across all the volumes he has edited and chosen one article from each.…


Forgotten Geographies in Asian Studies

UC Irvine history professor Jeffrey Wasserstrom recently concluded his ten-year tenure as editor of the Journal of Asian Studies. One of the new practices that Wasserstrom introduced as editor was a “JAS-at-AAS” panel at the annual conference.


Call For Africa Bibliography Introductory Papers

Articles of 5,000-8,000 words on topics relating to research, libraries, archives and publishing in and on Africa, and in African studies, are invited.…


The Accidental Austen Professor

In 1997, I was asked by my department chair at Marquette University to teach a course on Jane Austen. I had read all of her novels, some of them as a child, but had taught only one of them, Sense and Sensibility, as part of an undergraduate survey on British literature from 1800 to the present.…


An Englishman’s Home is His Castle? Shakespeare’s Violent Homes

In Woody Allen’s Amazon Prime series, Crisis in Six Scenes, his character Sidney suffers a home invasion. Sidney complains: ‘This is my home, this is my castle, you’re going into the moat!’ Allen is drawing on an Elizabethan proverb that still resonates today: ‘An Englishman’s home is his castle.’ This proverb encapsulated the ideal of a home as a bedrock of the state, ruled over by the (male) householder, and protected from dangers outside.…


Picture-Book Professors: Academia and Children’s Literature

How is academia represented in children’s literature? This was a question that became important to me in the spring of 2012, whilst reading reams of picture-books with my three young boys, and wondering what they were understanding of their mother’s chosen profession from the media they were being exposed to.…


Shaping the History of the Graphic Novel

Ten years ago, it would have been literally unthinkable to publish this volume. Nobody then would have believed in the lasting presence and impact of a genre that was still treated with little respect, a suspicious attempt to forget about the awful reputation of comics.…


Olando and women’s suffrage – Part 3

Orlando: Women’s Writing in the British Isles from the Beginnings to the Present is a digital text, available on the web at orlando.cambridge.org.…