Cambridge University Press to publish Renaissance Quarterly for the Renaissance Society of America

Cambridge University Press is partnering with the Renaissance Society of America (RSA) to publish Renaissance Quarterly, the leading American journal of Renaissance Studies.…


Celebrating Peter Holland’s 19 years as Editor of Shakespeare Survey

To mark his 19 years as Editor of Shakespeare Survey before stepping down this autumn, Peter Holland has looked back across all the volumes he has edited and chosen one article from each.…


Celebrating Anne Hathaway during International Women’s Month

In honour of Women's History Month 2018, we are sharing highlights throughout March, written by and about inspirational women. In the following blog post, Katherine West Scheil discusses the contributions of Anne Hathaway.


Putting the Spotlight on Female Playwrights in America

This International Women's Month, we are putting the spotlight on female playwrights in America. Read the following blog by Cambridge University Press author Christopher Bigsby to find out why this is the opportune moment for celebrating these talented female writers.


Discovering a ‘new’ Tudor ballad by John Heywood

Read Jane Flynn’s full article published in the journal British Catholic History. A few years ago, I did an internet search involving the name ‘John Heywood’, the Tudor court entertainer, poet, and musician.  One of the hits was from the catalogue of manuscripts of the Durham Cathedral Library, in a description of a book of accounts dating from 1561–75.  It mentioned that the account book contains a 38-stanza poem that ‘begins “When all that is to was ys brought / As all that hath byn is” and ends “Maye rest in rest aye restyngly / Amen quoth John Heywood” [John Heywood ?1497-?1580]’, with the name ‘Thomas Good at the end’.  I was intrigued: was the poem by Good or Heywood?…


An Englishman’s Home is His Castle? Shakespeare’s Violent Homes

In Woody Allen’s Amazon Prime series, Crisis in Six Scenes, his character Sidney suffers a home invasion. Sidney complains: ‘This is my home, this is my castle, you’re going into the moat!’ Allen is drawing on an Elizabethan proverb that still resonates today: ‘An Englishman’s home is his castle.’ This proverb encapsulated the ideal of a home as a bedrock of the state, ruled over by the (male) householder, and protected from dangers outside.…


Is Entertainment News Really News?

Is entertainment news really news? How much notice should actors receive in the newspapers, and why? In London’s media in the mid-eighteenth century, questions about the value of celebrity news were as warmly contested as they are now.…


Do we ‘read’ or ‘speak’ music? And what does the answer mean for transmitting knowledge in general?

In the July 2017 issue of the British Journal of Music Education (BJME), co-editor Martin Fautley’s editorial focuses on musical notation: when, why, and how it should be taught.…