Discovering a ‘new’ Tudor ballad by John Heywood

Read Jane Flynn’s full article published in the journal British Catholic History. A few years ago, I did an internet search involving the name ‘John Heywood’, the Tudor court entertainer, poet, and musician.  One of the hits was from the catalogue of manuscripts of the Durham Cathedral Library, in a description of a book of accounts dating from 1561–75.  It mentioned that the account book contains a 38-stanza poem that ‘begins “When all that is to was ys brought / As all that hath byn is” and ends “Maye rest in rest aye restyngly / Amen quoth John Heywood” [John Heywood ?1497-?1580]’, with the name ‘Thomas Good at the end’.  I was intrigued: was the poem by Good or Heywood?…


20 Years of Organised Sound: A Brief History

Issue 20/1 of Organised Sound marks the start of the journal’s twentieth year, offering the perfect opportunity to take a closer look at the formative years of OS and how the journal has developed into the focal point of electroacoustic music studies that it is today.…


What is Music Education?

It might be presumed that by having the words music education in its title, the British Journal of Music Education (BJME) would have a coherent view as to what its main topic of interest ought to be!…


Introducing Ben Jonson Online

The Cambridge Edition of the Works of Ben Jonson is now available as an online resource collection.    The first release of the online version of The Cambridge Edition of the Works of Ben Jonson took place in January 2014.…


The Challenge of Defining ‘Twentieth-Century Music’

This blog post, adapted from Robert Adlington and Julian Johnson’s Editorial of the latest issue of Twentieth-Century Music (TCM), considers what ‘Twentieth-Century music’ actually means, and how we define it after the end of the Twentieth Century.


Winner announced for the 2013 American Society for Theatre Research / Cambridge University Press Prize

Dassia Posner, Assistant Professor of Theatre at Northwestern University, was recently awarded the American Society for Theatre Research (ASTR)-Cambridge University Press Prize for her paper “Baring the Frame: Meyerhold’s ‘Reflective Analysis’ of Gozzi’s Love of/for Three Oranges.


Western Art Music in Japan: A Success Story?

This blogpost is adapted from Dr. Margaret Mehl’s introduction to the latest special issue of Nineteenth-Century Music Review. Japan’s successful modernization on Western premises, in the second half of the nineteenth century, included the introduction and adoption of Western music.…


Microhistory: a new avenue for theatre history?

This blogpost is adapted from the Editorial of Theatre Survey 55.1 by Guest Editor Peter A. Davis. Much work has been done over the past several decades to delineate new theatre historiographies and reimagine theoretical approaches to telling the history of the theatre.…


TEMPO – Tentative Affinities

This blogpost was adapted from the inaugural editorial by TEMPO’s new Editor Bob Gilmore and Reviews Editor Juliet Fraser. 2014 marks the 75th anniversary of TEMPO, and it seems appropriate to ask – in our world of instant connectivity, where information, attitudes and opinions are scattered online as freely as bat droppings – if the new music world still needs a quarterly periodical such as this.…


History without royalty? Queen and the strata of the popular music canon

My article, ‘History without royalty?  Queen and the strata of the popular music canon’, published in Popular Music (32.3), investigates canonisation processes in popular music, using Queen as a case study.  The ‘popular music canon’ has been discussed in popular music studies for over a decade now, and canonisation is not always welcome.…


‘We are here to salute the Red Army’: Basil Dean and His Russian Adventures

The latest issue of Theatre Survey includes an article by Dr Claire Warden entitled ‘“We are here to salute the Red Army”: Basil Dean and His Russian Adventures’.


Curriculum writing in music education: who’s in control?

This blogpost was adapted from Regina Murphy and Martin Fautley’s Editorial of British Journal of Music Education 30/3. We write curriculum documents that are full of good intentions – ambitious musical aims, the highest educational aspirations and holistic principles that place the learner at the centre.…