“Black Lives Matter and Catholic Whiteness: A Tale of Two Performances”

How do the voices and actions of the members of the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement speak to us in the Catholic theological academy?…


The historical significance of the 1966 Coleman Report

This blog accompanies the Policy Forum on the 1966 Coleman Report published in History of Education Quarterly. For this History of Education Quarterly Policy Forum, we look at the historical significance of the 1966 Coleman Report from several different perspectives.…


Re-assessing John Dewey’s Democracy and Education

This blog accompanies the new thematic issue of the Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era reassessing John Dewey’s 1916 publication Democracy and Education.…


Archaeological Echo of Marco Polo’s visit to China

Ran Zhang, of Durham University, discusses his recent paper ‘A Chinese Porcelain Jar Associated with Marco Polo: A Discussion from an Archaeological Perspective‘.…


Writing comparative and transnational histories in twenty-first century Ireland

This blog accompanies the new special issue of Irish Historical Studies, Ireland and Finland, 1860–1930: Comparative and Transnational Histories. Just over twenty years ago, the central debate among Irish historians could be presented as one between two competing strands of conservatism.…


ASR Forum: Land Disputes and Displacement in Post-Conflict Africa. Questioning Boundaries and Belonging

Conflict-related displacement is increasingly central in shaping land claims, property relations, and modes of belonging in the African continent. In settings of forced mobility and resettlement, land property claims define the continued struggles over community membership and access to resources.…


“Paul’s Place in a First-Century Revival of the Discourse of ‘Equality’”

The discourse of “equality,” which originated in democratic Athens, revived in the first century CE, in response to growing inequality between the classes.  Symptomatic of the increase in inequality in the early Roman Empire were the numerous and widespread outbreaks of riots and uprisings in the cities of Greece and Asia Minor in the first and second centuries CE.  Among the thinkers who revisited the idea of “equality” in this period was Paul of Tarsus, who appealed to the principle of “equality” in order to encourage the Christ-believers at Corinth to contribute to a collection of money for the poor in Jerusalem.  This essay compares Paul’s concept of “equality” with those of seven contemporaries (Philo, Plutarch, Dio Chrysostom, Pseudo-Ecphantus, Diotogenes, Sthenidas, Pseudo-Arcytas).  Paul’s concept of “equality” is shown to be significantly more “democratic” that those of his contemporaries.  More importantly, Paul extends the principle of “equality” into the socio-economic sphere, making “equality” the goal of relations between those who enjoy “abundance” and those who suffer “lack.”  Paul’s extension of the principle of “equality” into the sphere of economic relations has virtually no precedent in the Greco-Roman world.  The source of Paul’s originality is sought in the egalitarian impulses that were at work in the earliest communities of Christ-believers, and finally in Paul’s own theology.…


“Space, Place, and the Race for Power: Rabbis, Demons, and the Construction of Babylonia”

Demons were an important part of Late Antique life across religious divides. This article explores how the authors of the Babylonian Talmud “think with” the demonic to produce meaningful rabbinic spaces.…


“Exegesis and Appropriation: Reading Rashi in Late Medieval Spain”

The Commentary on the Torah of Rashi (Solomon ben Isaac; 1040–1105) stands out as the most widely studied and influential Hebrew Bible commentary ever composed.…


“Finitude, Phenomenology, and Theology in Heidegger’s Sein und Zeit”

Heidegger’s descriptions of Dasein’s “finitude” (Endlichkeit) in Sein und Zeit are based on Dasein’s experience of thrownness and mortality, and not on theology and the relation to God, methodologically suspended early on in the treatise.…


Cambridge Open – Celebrating International Open Access Week 2017

Cambridge University Press is proud to support International Open Access Week, running from 23rd to 29th October 2017. As a leading University Press we are actively engaged with Open Access, and our Open Access publishing platform, Cambridge Open, serves authors and the wider community by publishing high-quality, peer-reviewed OA content. Follow our Facebook and Twitter pages this week to read blog posts from our Open Access team, read our most-read Open Access articles, and learn more about Cambridge Open.


Open Access at the Press – more Gold, more Green, more sharing.

The development of our Open Access programme, Cambridge Open, continues to be a major area of importance for the Press, both Green and Gold OA.