How researchers can solve the bottle-opener problem with compute capsules

Imagine a group of people playing a sport together on a hot day. Although it’s a friendly match, they play vigorously and at the end of their game they’re hot and thirsty.…


Primary source volumes from the Royal Historical Society’s Camden Series

To mark the 150th anniversary of the Royal Historical Society, Cambridge University Press are making a selection of ten volumes from the Camden Series freely available to researchers until the end of the year.…


The Great Keyishian Case: lessons in academic freedom from the Cold War

When the History of Education Quarterly asked me to contribute to a symposium on academic freedom, I could hardly refuse. I had recently written a book about how anti-communist witch hunters in the late 1940s and 1950s attacked teachers and professors, and about the Supreme Court’s eventual (and much-belated) response in 1967–striking down a typical state loyalty law and announcing that academic freedom is a “a special concern of the First Amendment, which does not tolerate laws that cast a pall of orthodoxy over the classroom.” That case was called Keyishian v.


How did meat provision work in the nineteenth-century city?

Supplying food presents a major problem for urban history, for cities, beyond a certain size, cannot feed themselves. Provisioning meat in particular represents a critical juncture, because no other food item was so deeply and, in so many ways, tied to urban modernity.…


Celebrating Peter Holland’s 19 years as Editor of Shakespeare Survey

To mark his 19 years as Editor of Shakespeare Survey before stepping down this autumn, Peter Holland has looked back across all the volumes he has edited and chosen one article from each.…


Forgotten Geographies in Asian Studies

UC Irvine history professor Jeffrey Wasserstrom recently concluded his ten-year tenure as editor of the Journal of Asian Studies. One of the new practices that Wasserstrom introduced as editor was a “JAS-at-AAS” panel at the annual conference.


Special Forum: In Memory of the “Two Helmuts”: The Lives, Legacies, and Historical Impact of Helmut Schmidt and Helmut Kohl

This blog post is taken from the ‘Introduction by Andrew I. Port’ on a special forum that looks at the lives and legacies of Helmut Schmidt and Helmut Kohl.


A Response to Michael Sherry’s “War as a Way of Life”

A Response to Michael Sherry’s “War as a Way of Life” The United States never experienced sustained conflict on its mainland during the twentieth century.…


Industrial Manifest Destiny: American Firearms Manufacturing and Antebellum Expansion

Some of the United States’ most eminent arms manufacturers had their start in the middle of the nineteenth century. These were also the years that American industry began to surpass Europe’s, and that Americans’ belief in their right to “civilize” the continent became known as “Manifest Destiny.” The common link among these occurences was frontier violence.…


Imprensa Evangelica: forging new religious identities in nineteenth-century Brazil

Pedro Feitoza’s essay Experiments in Missionary Writing: Protestant Missions and the Imprensa Evangelica in Brazil, 1864-1892 is the inaugural winner of the World Christianities Essay Prize* It was in August 2008, in the countryside of the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, that I first encountered volumes of Brazil’s first Protestant periodical, the Imprensa Evangelica (Evangelical Press, 1864-1892).…


Research Reveals the Unique Political Organization and Landscape of Chichén Itzá

The Society for American Archaeology’s paper of the month for July comes from Latin American Antiquity and is entitled “The Political Organization and the Landscape of Chichén Itzá, Yucatan, Mexico, in the Classical Terminal Period (830-930AD)” Authors: Péter Bíró and Eduardo Pérez de Heredia The absence of references to the great city of Chichén Itzá in the Colonial chronicles, both indigenous and Spanish, which refer almost exclusively to the last century before the conquest, is very striking.…


Shaping the History of the Graphic Novel

Ten years ago, it would have been literally unthinkable to publish this volume. Nobody then would have believed in the lasting presence and impact of a genre that was still treated with little respect, a suspicious attempt to forget about the awful reputation of comics.…