Cambridge University Press to publish Renaissance Quarterly for the Renaissance Society of America

Cambridge University Press is partnering with the Renaissance Society of America (RSA) to publish Renaissance Quarterly, the leading American journal of Renaissance Studies.…


“What is the Meaning of Meaning in Paul Tillich’s Theology?”

For the past few years, I have been at work on a book about the word meaning in such expressions as “the meaning of life,” “searching for meaning,” “ultimate meaning,” “higher meaning.” Several features of the word, apart from its ubiquity in popular and academic circles, struck me: (1) it is seldom defined and is thus given to ambiguity; (2) its meaning is slippery; (3) the English word is by nature different from its near-equivalents in other European languages because it is a verbal noun and thus at least suggests agency: something carries out the act denoted by the verb to mean.…


Did the Rabbis Believe in Agreus Pan? Rabbinic Relationships with Roman Power, Culture, and Religion in Genesis Rabbah 63

Genesis Rabbah, a rabbinic midrash (work of homiletical exegesis) compiled in Byzantine Palestine relates a fascinating story about the great Roman emperor, Diocletian (224–311 CE).…


Imprensa Evangelica: forging new religious identities in nineteenth-century Brazil

Pedro Feitoza’s essay Experiments in Missionary Writing: Protestant Missions and the Imprensa Evangelica in Brazil, 1864-1892 is the inaugural winner of the World Christianities Essay Prize* It was in August 2008, in the countryside of the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, that I first encountered volumes of Brazil’s first Protestant periodical, the Imprensa Evangelica (Evangelical Press, 1864-1892).…


Beyond Procreation: Rereading Aquinas in the Context of Involuntary Childlessness in West and Central Africa

Using the work of Thomas Aquinas, the article from which this blog is extracted examines ways to construct an ethical framework for Christian communities in West Africa to address involuntary childlessness.…


Eliah Benamozegh, Franz Rosenzweig and their Blueprint of a Jewish Theology of Christianity

Recent developments in the Christian world (especially in the Catholic Church) regarding Christian-Jewish relations—initiated by the papal Nostra Aetate declaration of 1965—have led to the questioning of some classical Christian attitudes vis à vis “the Jews.” They have culminated in “the most important development in Christian teaching on the Jewish people since the second and third centuries” (R.…


Making the Invisible Visible: Inviting Persons with Disabilities into the Life of the Church

Dutch theologian Hans Reinders believes that being chosen as a friend is the greatest good we can do for other people, and for the common good: “The ultimate good is.…


Virtual Special Issue: Cold War in Latin America – Introduction

This virtual special issue highlights some of the exciting directions that scholarship on the Cold War in Latin America has taken over the last decade.…


“Black Lives Matter and Catholic Whiteness: A Tale of Two Performances”

How do the voices and actions of the members of the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement speak to us in the Catholic theological academy?…


“Paul’s Place in a First-Century Revival of the Discourse of ‘Equality’”

The discourse of “equality,” which originated in democratic Athens, revived in the first century CE, in response to growing inequality between the classes.  Symptomatic of the increase in inequality in the early Roman Empire were the numerous and widespread outbreaks of riots and uprisings in the cities of Greece and Asia Minor in the first and second centuries CE.  Among the thinkers who revisited the idea of “equality” in this period was Paul of Tarsus, who appealed to the principle of “equality” in order to encourage the Christ-believers at Corinth to contribute to a collection of money for the poor in Jerusalem.  This essay compares Paul’s concept of “equality” with those of seven contemporaries (Philo, Plutarch, Dio Chrysostom, Pseudo-Ecphantus, Diotogenes, Sthenidas, Pseudo-Arcytas).  Paul’s concept of “equality” is shown to be significantly more “democratic” that those of his contemporaries.  More importantly, Paul extends the principle of “equality” into the socio-economic sphere, making “equality” the goal of relations between those who enjoy “abundance” and those who suffer “lack.”  Paul’s extension of the principle of “equality” into the sphere of economic relations has virtually no precedent in the Greco-Roman world.  The source of Paul’s originality is sought in the egalitarian impulses that were at work in the earliest communities of Christ-believers, and finally in Paul’s own theology.…


“Space, Place, and the Race for Power: Rabbis, Demons, and the Construction of Babylonia”

Demons were an important part of Late Antique life across religious divides. This article explores how the authors of the Babylonian Talmud “think with” the demonic to produce meaningful rabbinic spaces.…


Moving Texts: A Hermeneutics of the Gospel According to Hollywood

Angelic choirs hum as calligraphic titles fill the screen. As the choir soars, an authoritative voice begins a tale that may be both alien and familiar: the coming of a heavenly visitor whose story bears repeating.…