Tornadoes, Fire and Ice

Listening to tornadoes to increase warning times and save lives, studying the effect of ice on the combustion of oil spills, and investigating how sea ice affects our climate – discover the latest research in Fluid Dynamics.…


CO2 beneath our feet

Climate change is currently one of the biggest threats to human existence. Carbon sequestration – the storage of CO2 underground – is one innovative method that could help to reduce the amount of CO2 in the Earth’s atmosphere and ultimately save the human species.…


Demand for wild bear bile in Vietnam is not satisfied by commercially farmed alternatives

For the past 20 years in Vietnam, thousands of bears have been held in cages up and down the country so that bile, extracted directly from a bear’s gallbladder, can supply the Traditional Asian Medicine market.…


Storing Energy: The race for sustainable solutions

One of the biggest challenges facing the energy sector is how to store our energy when it’s not being used so that we can satisfy the peaks and troughs of our daily energy demands.…


The Quaternary Record of Loess Deposits

Deposits of loess (deposits of windblown dust of silt size) are widely distributed in mid- and high-latitude areas of North America, Europe, and Asia.…


From snowball Earth to the Cambrian explosion: Evidence from China

Geological Magazine Guest Editor, Xian-Hua Li answers questions on the thematic issue “From Snowball Earth to the Cambrian Explosion: Evidence from China”.…


Beehive fences protect farms from foraging elephants in Tanzania

Southern Tanzania is home to over half of East Africa’s elephants making it a globally important region for their conservation. Unfortunately, abrupt boundaries between protected areas and farmland mean elephants easily wander into village farms and eat or trample human food crops or both.…


How shifting continents influence global CO2 and climate

Continental configurations have come and gone over Earth’s history. From the steady cycling through supercontinental arrangements to the distributed scattering of numerous continents separated by oceans today, the geography of our world is constantly changing.…


Bioinspiration, underwater sniffing, and mixing toothpaste

Learn how termites are inspiring new building designs, how the star-nosed mole can sniff underwater, and what goes into making your toothpaste!…


Pardon the disruption: how perovskites have made their mark in solar

New research published in MRS Bulletin explores how materials researchers are flocking to the field of Perovskites as a way to meaningfully impact the solar energy market and energy consumption at large. Watch our video introduction and read the paper for free!


Political Control and Policymaking Uncertainty in Environmental Justice Policies

Inequities in the enforcement of environmental regulations are an important problem, as a number of studies show that ethnic minorities and low-income citizens are likely to suffer disproportionately from the effects of toxic waste, and air and water pollution.  In response to this problem, President Clinton signed Executive Order 12898 in February, 1994 which required all federal agencies to consider “disproportionately high and adverse human health or environmental effects of its programs, policies, and activities on minority populations and low-income populations” when writing new regulatory rules.…


We think we’re the first advanced earthlings—but how do we really know?

Imagine if, many millions of years ago, dinosaurs drove cars through cities of mile-high buildings. A preposterous idea, right? Over the course of tens of millions of years, however, all of the direct evidence of a civilization—its artifacts and remains—gets ground to dust. How do we really know, then, that there weren’t previous industrial civilizations on Earth that rose and fell long before human beings appeared? It’s a compelling thought experiment, and one that Adam Frank, a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Rochester, and Gavin Schmidt, the director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, take up in a paper published in the International Journal of Astrobiology.