MRS Communications Lecture Prize 2017

Sharon C. Glotzer, from the University of Michigan, has been awarded the 2017 MRS Communications Lecture Award.


Change is inevitable; change is constant

Extracts from a recent Editorial by MRS Bulletin Editor-in-Chief Gopal Rao which talked about the recent launch of the newly designed site.


2016 JMR Paper of the Year awarded

Gayle and Cook have won the 2016 JMR Paper of the Year, for the development and modeling of an indentation method for mapping the time-dependent viscoelastic and time-independent plastic properties of polymeric-based materials.


Rigoberto C. Advincula announced as Editor-in-Chief for MRS Communications

The Materials Research Society (MRS) and Cambridge University Press are pleased to announce the appointment of Rigoberto C. Advincula, as Editor-in-Chief of MRS Communications.


Climate change and risks to fossil fuel industry: sustainability train has left the station

Two seminal articles by energy experts in the latest issue of MRS Energy and Sustainability (MRS E&S) examine the climate-related risks facing the fossil fuel industry and conclude that the sustainability train has already well and truly left the station – and is not coming back.


Susmita Bose appointed JMR Associated Editor for Biomaterials

Journal of Materials Research is pleased to announce the appointment of Professor Susmita Bose as Associate Editor for Biomaterials.


Liquid hydrogen may be way forward for sustainable air travel

With sustainable solutions in mind, a new study published by eminent physicist Jo Hermans in MRS Energy and Sustainability—A Review Journal (MRS E&S) looks at the energy efficiency of current modes of transportion.


Intel’s Carolyn Duran stays the course toward conflict-free minerals

Because of its high strength and favorable dielectric properties, tantalum has become an invaluable material to the microelectronics industry. That value, unfortunately, has not been lost on rebel militias in the heart of Africa, where the extraction of the lustrous metal has become a deadly means for financing civil war.