Nanofibres in a spin

Nano-materials are seen as the future in fields as diverse as medicine, technology and chemistry, but the methods used to create them are not yet fully understood.…


SWI: a Barrier to Coastal Management

Maintaining water quality is a global concern and, with the onset of climate change and the increased expansion of the human population, it is likely only to become even more important in the future.…


The steady golfer vs. the brilliant golfer: who would win over 72 holes?

This weekend Jordan Spieth will attempt to become the youngest golfer to win the career Grand Slam when he tees off at the US PGA Championship.…


Proving the Kepler Conjecture

In 1998, Thomas Hales and Samuel Ferguson announced a proof of the Kepler conjecture – a famous problem in discrete geometry that had remained unsolved for over 300 years.…


Celebrate Pi Day with Forum of Mathematics

Pi Day is celebrated around the world on the 14th day of the 3rd month. The date representation of 3.14 is the most basic ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter, but it also has this going for it: Which, of course, means that mathematicians everywhere love their pi.…


An Interview with 2016 Batchelor Prize winner Prof Raymond E. Goldstein

Watch an interview with Professor Raymond E. Goldstein


John Ockendon Prize 2016: Winner Announced

The European Journal of Applied Mathematics and Cambridge University Press are pleased to award the 2016 John Ockendon Prize to S. J Chapman and S. E McBurnie for their winning article ‘Integral constraints in multiple-scales problems’ published in EJAM’s Special Anniversary Issue, October 2015.


How maths could help predict future crime and terrorist attacks

From terrorist attacks to riots and residential burglaries, the latest special issue of the European Journal of Applied Mathematics – published by Cambridge University Press – includes a series of cutting-edge articles that show how maths can be used to predict a broad range of problems related to crime and security.